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Table. 4.

Table. 4.

Specific responses regarding barriers against of safe drug uses between disability types

Type of Disability Category Statements
Visually impaired Barriers to identifying proper medicines As there are many medicines, it is difficult to tell what kind of medicine they are because they are indistinguishable from each other. As the medicines are in similar boxes, it is difficult to judge by its shape alone. (Study participant number 9)
Same pharmacy same package. As I take the medicines on my own, sometimes I confuse some medicines each other. (Study participant number 11)
I once mistook the skin ointment for eye ointment and applied it to my eyes. (omitted) Then I was surprised by the pain. If there was no pain, I would apply it just without recognition. (Study participant number 13)
Barriers to following prescribed dosage The tablets are very small and easy to drop. It's hard to find them as I’m blind. (omitted) Then I just discard last of them and take the new one. (Study participant number 3)
I often take day and night medicine by mistake. (omitted) I opened the package by mistake, took the morning medicine at lunch, or took the night medicine at lunch. (Study participant number 8)
I have a lot to go out for. It's past eleven óclock in the night when I get home. It's hard for me to get water if I want to take medicine outside. So, I often take medicine late or not. (Study participant number 16)
Hearing impaired Problems with sign language interpretation system Compared to the number of deaf people in the region, there are not enough sign language interpreters. (omitted) I often postpone my appointment as I can't go to the hospital without a interpreter. (omitted) It's hard to go to the hospital with a sign language interpreter when I suddenly feel sick. (Study participant number 2)
Interpreters working in hospitals are often change to others. I hope an interpreter to work in the hospital for a long time. (omitted) There are many inconveniences as the interpreter changes frequently. (Study participant number 5)
The schedule often overlaps due to the lack of sign language interpreters. Then I just go with one of my family members or express by writing. (omitted) It is difficult to communicate in sign language without an interpreter. That's why I often don't know much about medicine. (Study participant number 8)
According to some deaf people I know, they were told by a sign language interpreter that they had illnesses, but what they found out later were not true. (Study participant number 7)
For children, exclusion of the patient from communication My mother consulted the doctor at the hospital and didn't tell me what was going on. (omitted) I want to know what the situation is, but I'm not sure what it means. (Study participant number 9)
Korean J Clin Pharm 2021;31:311-23 https://doi.org/10.24304/kjcp.2021.31.4.311
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