pISSN 1226-6051
eISSN 2508-786X

Table. 3.

Table. 3.

Common responses regarding barriers against of safe drug uses between disability types

Category Disability type Statements
Lack of consideration and services Visually impaired I can't go to university hospitals alone. Moreover, there are too many people in the hospital to find a guide. Whenever we go to a university hospital, blind people feel like idiots themselves. Therés nothing we can do. (Study participant number 12)
Hearing impaired We get information by subtitles. But there are limited places that provide subtitles. Most pharmacies don't provide them. (Study participant number 3)
I couldn't speak sign language after the surgery, so I just looked at the simple mouth movements and communicated with them to the extent that I answered yes or no. (omitted) It is so much frustrated. (Study participant number 8)
Limited medical institution selection and low accessibility Visually impaired The visually impaired have difficulty at moving. So even simple drugs are often difficult to get on their own. (omitted) I can't take the right medicine for the right symptoms every time. If I have a similar medicine at home, I may take it. (Study participant number 9)
Hearing impaired It's inconvenient because therés no sign language interpreter at a small hospital nearby, so I've got to write all the time. Sign language interpretation services are a major reason for using university hospitals. (Study participant number 5)
I'd like to change my current medicine, but the hospital I'm in says therés no medicine I want. (omitted) It's quiet near my house and there aren't many people, so I just visit it... I couldn't go anywhere else. (Study participant number 3)
Barriers to accessing information regarding medication use Visually impaired I sometimes received Tylenol with Braille on the box, but it was so timid that it was hard to recognize whether it was Braille or just popped out. (Study participant number 1)
I've never read a prescription because I'm blind. I always forget the information about the medicine, no matter how many times I hear it. (omitted) It takes too much effort to know the information. (Study participant number 9)
Hearing impaired I don't have enough sign language skills, I don't have good hearing, (omitted) so I just give up. (omitted) It's hard for me to learn sign language as I got old. (Study participant number 3)
Most deaf people have poor writing skills so most of us don't understand written sentences. (omitted) I thought about taking sign language videos to explain the medicine or solving technical terms simply. (Study participant number 7)
psychological anxiety about drug use and side effects Visually impaired I have glaucoma, so I tend to be careful of side effects when I take medicine. (omitted) I'd like the pharmacists to explain side effects of medicines basically. (Study participant number 2)
I'm worried that my eyes might get worse by taking medicines. (Study participant number 11)
Hearing impaired If I had known that taking Mycin for a long time would reduce my hearing ability, I would have refrained from taking the medicine. But I took it a lot without knowing it. (Study participant number 7)
COVID-19 inconvenience Visually impaired When I visited Asan Medical Center, supportive service for blind were disappeared by the coronavirus pandemic. The volunteers could not come to help us. (Study participant number 7)
Hearing impaired When Corona-related guidelines were not established yet, the Sign Language Interpretation Center was closed for a very long time. Hearing-impaired people need sign language interpreters when they use hospitals or public organizations, but the centers were all stopped. (Study participant number 7)
Korean J Clin Pharm 2021;31:311-23 https://doi.org/10.24304/kjcp.2021.31.4.311
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